Research

Research

While using the well-defined model of Multiple Sclerosis (MS), an autoimmune disease in which our own immune cells attack myelin components in the central nervous system (CNS), the laboratory of Nathan Karin explores the mechanistic basis of immunological tolerance and develop novel therapeutic strategies. For so doing it uses cutting edge molecular and immunological techniques, while integrating molecular immunology and clinically oriented research. Its major focus is on chemokines and their role in the immuno-biology of bone marrow derived immune cells. The lab extends its studies to two other models of autoimmune diseases (IBD and type I diabetes) and one cancer disease. Another path of research in the lab focuses on exploring the genetic basis of several auto-inflammatory diseases.

Genetic basis of auto-inflammatory diseases

Exploring the genetic basis of auto-inflammatory diseases and development of personalized based therapy for these diseases Read more...

Exploring the role of chemokines in cancer diseases

Chemokines are small proteins that are produced by immune cells and by cancer cells. Cancer cells use them as survival/growth factors, and also for attraction of bone marrow derived cells that would support tumor invasion and growth Read more...

Investigating the role of a group of small chemotactic cytokines

Exploring the role of a group of small chemotactic cytokines named chemokines in the regulation of leukocyte migration and function in autoimmune diseases and also in cancer diseases Read more...

Exploring the biological basis of self- non-self recognition by the immune system

Exploring the biological basis of self- non-self recognition by the immune system, in particular how immunological tolerance is actively maintained in Multiple Sclerosis, type I diabetes and Intestinal Bowel’s disease (IBD) Read more...